Disinfecting The Water Using UV Radiation




Credit: 4 PDH

Course Fee: $48.00

23 Pages

 

Course Summary

This course provides guidance for disinfecting the water using UV Radiation. Unlike most disinfectants, ultraviolet (UV) radiation does not inactivate microorganisms by chemical interaction. UV radiation inactivates organisms by absorption of the light which causes a photochemical reaction that alters molecular components essential to cell function. As UV rays penetrate the cell wall of the microorganism, the energy reacts with nucleic acids and other vital cell components, resulting in injury or death of the exposed cells. There is ample evidence to conclude that if sufficient dosages of UV energy reach the organisms, UV can disinfect water to whatever degree is required. However, there has been some public health concerns with respect to the overall efficiency of UV to disinfect potable water. UV radiation quickly dissipates into water to be absorbed or reflected off material within the water.


UV radiation energy waves are the range of electromagnetic waves 100 to 400 nm long (between the X-ray and visible light spectrums). The division of UV radiation may be classified as Vacuum UV (100-200 nm), UV-C (200-280 nm), UV-B (280-315 nm) and UV-A (315-400 nm). In terms of germicidal effects, the optimum UV range is between 245 and 285 nm. UV disinfection utilizes either: low-pressure lamps that emit maximum energy output at a wavelength of 253.7 nm; medium pressure lamps that emit energy at wavelengths from 180 to 1370 nm; or lamps that emit at other wavelengths in a high intensity pulsed manner.

Learning Objectives

  • UV CHEMISTRY (PHOTOCHEMICAL)
    • UV Radiation
    • UV Disinfection Reactions
    • Process Variables
  • GENERATION
    • UV Lamps
    • Ballasts
    • UV Reactor Design
  • PRIMARY USES AND POINTS OF APPLICATION
  • PATHOGEN INACTIVATION AND DISINFECTION EFFICIENCY
    • Inactivation Mechanism
    • Environmental Effects
    • Disinfection Efficacy
  • DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS OF UV RADIATION
    • Ground Water
    • Surface Water
    • DBP Formation with Chlorination and Chloramination following UV Radiation
  • STATUS OF ANALYTICAL METHODS
    • Monitoring of Generated Ultraviolet Radiation
    • Disinfectant Interferences
  • OPERATIONAL CONSIDERATIONS
    • Equipment Operation
    • Equipment Maintenance
    • Standby Power
  • SUMMARY TABLE

Course Author

Environmental Protection Agency

 

 

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